Our Artists

Emily Hall – Owner

A self-taught artist from the small town of Grangeville, Idaho. Mainly
working with acrylics, paper, and wax, her artwork is largely autobiographical and
illustrative in nature, with dark humor being an underpinning theme in most of her
scenes.

The discovery process of my life and primary language is through art. The history
of this evolution is in a myriad of notebooks continually created since I was very
young. The threads are clear: a love of texture and nature, a delight in cartoon, and
a place for emotional release.

The materials I use are rich with association. They’re discoveries along the way or
gifts from friends, sometimes presented as a challenge. Their experiential nature
amplifies the emotional component of my work, resulting in compositions that are
personal and yet universal. As a professional picture framer I understand the role
frames have as essential extensions of art. They contribute to my passion for 3-
dimensional elements in 2-dimensional media. They enclose, bring closure, and
help convey the nature of how I make sense of things.

I see the tension of opposites in life as beauty and an ongoing challenge to
capture. Embrace the unconventional. It’s an invitation to the viewer that is not
forced, but rather to associate, to remember, to name. Still I suggest guidelines.
Don’t back from the tragic or emotional. See the dark as part of life’s fabric which I
explore with lightness, humor and irony. Enjoy a little acting out. Question realism.
Love symbolic implication in black and white compositions. Toss rigidity, get
vulnerable, be provoked, read the titles.

 

Katie Machain

Katie Machain is a Missoula based artist who uses traditional methods of printmaking to create her colorful woodcut prints. Much of her subject matter explores the relationship between the human experience and nature. To Katie, the reduction printing process is just as much a part of the meaning as the artwork itself. Each piece was created by carving into a wood block that is then inked-up and printed during different stages of the carving process. Thus, each color is its own layer, and once the final layer is printed, all previous layers are lost. This process is a metaphor for life itself, and our inability to change the previous layers of our lives. For more of Katie’s work and to learn more about her process visit www.katiemachain.com.

 

Abby Elliott

 

The collages I create are useful tools for expressing my thoughts and emotions. I’m inspired by nature, current events, books, and life experiences. Many pieces explore intimate landscapes, using symbols to weave a dialog. My concern for the environment is frequently on my mind. My photographs, a variety of antique print images, specialty papers, stencils, stamps, acrylic paints and mediums are the basis of many of my collages. Techniques I enjoy using are gel transfers, freezer paper transfers and printing on silk tissue paper.  Lately, my process has been to begin with a photograph that inspires me and then I develop the piece from there. A. Elliott attended Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA.

 

Frank Anderson

 

Being born and raised in Eastern Montana, it seemed only natural that I was influenced by the work of Charlie Russell and the photographer L.A. Huffman, who seemed to be so ubiquitous at the time. I was encouraged at a young age by my mother and my 3rd grade teacher, Mrs. Johnson, to draw and paint. Most of my life I only dabbled in it, becoming serious about the arts only later in life. It is something in my soul that needs to be expressed, if only in a small way, and hopefully others might appreciate my love of the landscape. My landscapes are painted exclusively in oil on canvas because I enjoy the application, fluidity, and luminosity that the medium presents. I work mainly from photographs while in my studio, but do enjoy plein air painting as well.